We’re victim, not cause of Apapa gridlock, says APM Terminals 

Trucks-on-Apapa-Road

The Management of APM Terminals Apapa has said that it is a victim of the menacing Apapa gridlock, just like other stakeholders doing business in the port community.

In a statement issued to its customers weekend, copy of which was obtained by SHIPS & PORTS DAILY, APM Terminals said its employees, service providers, contractors and customers have to go through the harrowing traffic experience everyday, like every other person.

The statement reads in part: “We are aware APM Terminals is being accused as the cause of the traffic gridlock in the Apapa area and we would like to set the record straight.

“APM Terminals Apapa is as much of a victim of the traffic gridlock as everyone else. Our employees, service providers, contractors and customers have to go through the harrowing traffic experience everyday.

“These employees are the ones that operate the equipment that service the trucks and would not by any means delay or stop servicing trucks unnecessarily as it would equate to ‘shooting ourselves in the foot’.

“We have always updated our stakeholders on the traffic situation in the Apapa area and it amazes us that APM Terminals is tagged as the cause of the situation. We will not deter in doing what is right, and would always communicate the true position of things to you our esteemed customer.

“In the last 24 hours, we have gated out about 1,000 trucks, this is the reason for the movement of the trucks on the queue waiting to enter the port. Like we always say, if we do not gate out trucks, it is almost impossible to gate in new trucks.”

The company said it was able to gate out 1,000 trucks within 24 hours because the port roads were freed up late last week and hence outflow was good, which allowed it to gate in trucks to load out more.  

The leading terminal operator assured its customers that it would continue to update them on the traffic situation.

APM Terminals Apapa is the operator of the largest container terminal in Nigeria and in the West African sub-region.    

Copyright 2017 Ships & Ports Ltd. Permission to use quotations from this article is granted subject to appropriate credit given to www.shipsandports.com.ng as the source.