African Circle donates gifts worth 0.5 million to physically challenged children

In commemoration of its 10th year anniversary, African Circle Pollution Management Limited had donated items worth half a million naira to physically challenged children.

African Circle Pollution Management Limited is a private indigenous company licensed to operate port reception facilities for the collection, storage and processing of ship generated waste on behalf of the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) on a Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) contract.

The company which commenced operations in September 2004 is half way into fulfilling its twenty-year contract with NPA and has lined up programs to celebrate the anniversary.

Part of its programs was a visit to the Hearts of Gold Children’s Hospice, a home for physically challenged children.

Staff of the company, led by its Head Human Resource Department, Stella Johnson, paid a visit to Hearts of Gold Children Hospice located at Surulere in Lagos bearing gift items worth N500,000.

The items include two air-condition split units, baby food, beverages, baby clothes, toys and other baby essentials.

Speaking with SHIPS & PORTS DAILY, Johnson said that since the company started, it has been growing strongly and has decided that there was no better way to commemorate its ten years in operations than to give back to the society.

“Since God has blessed us richly, we felt its good we also give back to the society. We went round and saw these children that needs love and care. We visited them two weeks ago, saw their needs, went back to our management with reports of what the children needed and the management approved of it,” Johnson said.

Johnson passionately appealed to other members of the society to come to the aid of the children by donating generously Hearts of Gold Hospice.

Founder of Hearts of God Hospice, Mrs Omolaja Adedoyin, expressed appreciation to the company for its donation.

“I will not let you down. We will continue our best to take care of these children with the help of donors like you. What you are sowing is not going to go to waste,” Adedoyin said.