Houston ship channel pilots resume boarding outbound vessels

 Houston Ship Channel pilots resumed boarding outbound ships at 12:00 pm CST (1800 GMT), according to port agent J.J. Plunkett.  Thirty ships were set to arrive and 24 ships were booked to sail outbound Monday, Plunkett said.  The influx of ships from the channel opening can cause issues for bunker suppliers as many ships will request their fuel at the same time. This is the main issue bunker suppliers face, one supplier said. Although it can be problematic, it is nothing new. This happens every year, the supplier said.  Fog was expected to increase overnight, but a front moving in Tuesday morning could blow out the remaining fog.  "Tonight the fog will start in again [...] . We will move as many ships as we can today," he said.   The suspension of ship movements in the Houston Ship Channel affects the delivery and loading schedules of crude oil, petroleum and petrochemical products. The 52-mile ship channel provides access from the Gulf of Mexico through Galveston Bay to various ports in Houston and other cities in the area that have many industrial facilities, including refineries, petrochemical plants and steel and metal facilities.  
Houston Ship Channel pilots resumed boarding outbound ships at 12:00 pm CST (1800 GMT), according to port agent J.J. Plunkett.

Thirty ships were set to arrive and 24 ships were booked to sail outbound Monday, Plunkett said.

The influx of ships from the channel opening can cause issues for bunker suppliers as many ships will request their fuel at the same time. This is the main issue bunker suppliers face, one supplier said. Although it can be problematic, it is nothing new. This happens every year, the supplier said.

Fog was expected to increase overnight, but a front moving in Tuesday morning could blow out the remaining fog.

“Tonight the fog will start in again […] . We will move as many ships as we can today,” he said.

The suspension of ship movements in the Houston Ship Channel affects the delivery and loading schedules of crude oil, petroleum and petrochemical products. The 52-mile ship channel provides access from the Gulf of Mexico through Galveston Bay to various ports in Houston and other cities in the area that have many industrial facilities, including refineries, petrochemical plants and steel and metal facilities.